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December Today in Terrorism

December 23, 2015: Suicide bombing in Cameroon

On this day in December 2015 a female suicide bomber recruited by Boko Haram killed two in northern Cameroon.

NGUETCHEWE, CAMEROON – You know you are doing well as a terrorist group when your reach extends to neighbouring nations.

I am fairly certain that most of my readers are familiar with the Nigerian terrorist group Boko Haram. After all, it has been around for over a decade and wreaking havoc in that country, predominantly the northern states, for years.

Boko Haram does not seem to care how much death and destruction it has caused. It will go from kidnapping hundreds of schoolchildren – to be used as porters, sex slaves, or recruits for more terrorism – to killing randomly in markets and town centres. It is a particularly nasty bunch.

Boko Haram: Who are the Nigerian jihadist insurgents and how are they  funded? | The Independent | The Independent
Wait, is that man saying “we’re #1!” or giving us the collective finger?? (Photo: AFP)

The terrorist organisation has been so successful over the years that it has been spreading its operations, at first concentrated in Nigeria’s northwest states, into neighbouring Niger, Chad, Benin…and Cameroon.

On this day in December 2015

A female suicide bomber blew herself up in the town of Nguetchewe in Cameroon’s Far North Region, also killing a small girl accompanying her and a local resident. On that same day, the group launched four attacks in all over 24 hours on villages in Niger, Chad and Cameroon, killing at least seven people in total.

Boko Haram’s days do not seem to be numbered, no matter what the Nigerian military and government have to say (in fact, every Christmas an announcement comes out saying the group is all but dead – stay tuned). As a result you can expect more blogs and podcasts from Borealis in the future on these terrorists.

I wish I could say differently.

By Phil Gurski

Phil Gurski is the President and CEO of Borealis Threat and Risk Consulting Ltd. and Director of the National Security programme at the University of Ottawa’s Professional Development Institute (PDI). Phil is a 32-year veteran of CSE and CSIS and the author of six books on terrorism.

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